Working Group on Women and Representation

                  

Mission:

While women are half of the population, they are less than a quarter of elected U.S. political leaders. Research finds important procedural and policy consequences resulting from unbalanced representation. Legislatures with more women are more likely to discuss – and pass – legislation relating to women, children, and families. Men and women have significantly different opinions on hot-button public policy issues, including foreign policy, education, social safety net issues, and gun control. Having more gender balance in our national and state legislative bodies would make democracy more representative both descriptively, which has important role model effects for young women, and substantively. Political deliberation and negotiation also change in critical ways when women, as well as men, are participants.  

SSN scholars in the Working Group on Women and Representation are at the forefront of this research. They are well-positioned to prepare briefs, media contributions, consultations, and public presentations that highlight the benefits to having more women in office, diagnose the current challenges women face in running for office, and suggest a number of intervention strategies to address these.

Projects:

Co-Leaders

Assistant Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University-Camden; Scholar, Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers University-New Brunswick
Assistant Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University-Camden

Members

Professor of Political Science, San Diego State University
Executive Director and Chief Economist, Washington Center for Equitable Growth
Professor of Political Science, University of Calgary
Associate Professor of Political Science and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Emory University
PhD Student in Human and Organizational Development, Fielding Graduate University
Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Alabama
Assistant Professor of Political Science, Temple University
Assistant Professor of Political Science, Syracuse University
Postdoctoral Associate of Political Science, Yale University
Professor of Politics, Princeton University
Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University
Professor of Public Policy and Politics, Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, University of Virginia
Assistant Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University-Camden; Scholar, Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers University-New Brunswick
Professor of Politics, University of Sussex